Meta-study finds Reiki is better than placebo

Some research published in 2017 suggests that Reiki is better than a placebo and figures show it has broad potential as a complimentary health therapy.

Published in the Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine, the metastudy looked at 13 studies that explored the efficacy of a Reiki therapist versus a sham Reiki Therapist (an actor) in a range of environments.

The criteria to be included in the meta study was for studies that worked with “hands on Reiki”, ones that included a control group (a sham Reiki practitioner), studies that were published in peer reviewed journals and those that had a sample size of 20(+) participants per sample group (with a couple of exceptions).

Studies that were included looked at the efficacy of Reiki in helping with relaxation, dealing with chronic illness – particularly in dealing with chronic pain and depression and where people are in acute circumstances such as pain relief during a medical procedure.

The meta study found that receiving a Reiki attunement produced a statistically significant difference in wellbeing outcomes for a range of conditions, compared to someone that had not been attuned and non-intervention control groups. Where is it didn’t show any significant benefit was in acute pain circumstances and in improving health conditions such as fibromyalgia.

It lead the researchers to conclude:
“Reiki is a safe and gentle “complementary” therapy that activates the parasympathetic nervous system to heal body and mind. It has potential for broader use in management of chronic health conditions, and possibly in postoperative recovery.”

To find out more the metastudy can be read here, to see what the recorded benefits are.